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Restore the balance you crave to thrive in Alaska’s extreme seasons by…

    • Healing the root causes of menstrual discomfort or irregularity…
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Alaskan women have extraordinary lives:  We pick berries for hours, hunt and fish, walk the long way around moose blocking our paths, consider Xtra tuffs essential to the wardrobe, endure the cold to watch the northern lights, and undertake all kinds of crazy fun adventures.  We are blessed to have nature and the wilds right outside our doors.

Unfortunately, Alaska’s seasonal extremes can play havoc with our health. Under the midnight sun we push ourselves to complete a myriad of tasks and pleasures, wired and tired by so much to do while the weather is good and the sun is still up. And then before we know it the scales have tipped and winter finds us starting a car at 40 below, working during the daylight hours, or tackling the cold to ski, mush or build a snowman with our kids. Deep winter also kindles our cravings -for rich foods, and the desire to curl up with movies and books near a toasty woodstove.

For many of us, doing the things we love pushes our limits time and time again, building upon other stressors in our life to cumulatively deplete our reserves. For some, the extremes of light and darkness play havoc with sleep regulation, immune function, mood, food cravings or appetite control.

Jen Landry in her backyard

Photo © Jen Landry, in her amazing backyard
sea lion with trash around its neck
Image © Jen Landry. This sea lion can’t see the trash irritating his neck but clearly his life could be better. Inian Islands, Southeast Alaska. Sea lions are curious and playful and thus susceptible to entanglement with trash floating in the ocean. For more info: www.entangledsealions.adfg.alaska.gov and https://www.nps.gov/glbs/blogs/Currents.htm

It is obvious but often overlooked that there is a difference between not being sick and Functional or Optimal Wellness.

Doctors and routine lab tests are often seeking to identify an illness.  Your doctor may feel that you are healthy, yet you know you have felt better and want to feel that way again.  Over time, stressors, such as physical overwork, relationship stress, nutritional deficiencies, or a lack of spiritual fulfilment, diminish the body’s vitality and make us vulnerable to fatigue, headaches, moodiness, allergies, reduced libido, infertility, and many other symptoms that can pile atop one another and drag us down.  These symptoms can be perplexing as there may be nothing medically wrong.  Your doctor may feel that you are healthy and routine lab tests show nothing to be alarmed at—yet you know that you have felt better and want to feel that way again.

Don’t you want to be able to keep doing the things you love, in the places you love?

Functional Wellness combines holistic assessments with lab testing to identify the root causes of health imbalances and customize a plan for health.  To use an analogy—I enjoy bicycling for my commute, but we are so busy with everything else that bike maintenance often gets neglected.   Recently, a knowledgeable friend helped me do a complete tune-up and pointed out that grit buildup and neglected components were causing me to work at least 5-10% harder than necessary.  While I’d known intuitively that my bike could perform better, I couldn’t see problems that were immediately clear to an expert.   If I’d continued to ignore the small issues, they would have snowballed until one day I’d be dismayed to find a major malfunction to address before going anywhere.

Kodiak mountain goat on high ledge.
Kodiak mountain goat on high ledge. Take charge of your health, before symptoms drive you over a precipice.
Photo © Jen Landry
winter camping in Interior Alaska
Photo © Jen Landry, Winter Camping Trip, Interior Alaska

This is the role I play as a Functional Wellness Practitioner, empowering you to see your body’s health through a new perspective. Symptoms are signposts of a compromised system that can perform better. Functional lab work is non-invasive and yields solid insights into visible and invisible stressors on core systems of your body–hormonal, metabolic, digestive, immune–enabling you to address root causes and take concrete actions to meet short and long term goals of improved well being. My goal is to address these symptoms before they snowball into more serious concerns.

wild violet
Wild Violet Photo © Jen Landry

“I am happy, deep inside. Not the mind-tiredness of too much thought, of thoughts that pursue each other endlessly in that forest of nerves, anxiety, and fear. But a stretching kind of tiredness, the ease and satisfaction of time well spent, and of the deep self renewed.”

John Haines, The Stars, The Snow, The Fire

For more info on Functional Diagnostic Nutrition™  www.functionaldiagnosticnutrition.com

STELLER BOTANICAL HEALTH LOGO DESIGN BY NATURALIST AND ILLUSTRATOR KATHERINE HOCKER.  SHE ROCKS!

For more information, contact kmhocker@gmail.com

How can I help you reach your goals?

Lab Testing as appropriate.

Herbal Therapeutic Support.  Growing public demand for herbal products has resulted in an expanding body of scientific studies validating the efficacy of herbal remedies.  Trained as a Functional Diagnostic Nutrition Practitioner <®>  (FDN-P) and Clinical Herbalist, Jen synthesizes the ancient art and traditional wisdom of plant based remedies with modern scientific and clinical research.  I am happy to work with your medical doctors and other healthcare providers to ensure that the herbal therapies you receive are safe and understood by all professionals concerned with your health.

Lifestyle Practices.  Women are often so focused on nourishing others.  What do you need to integrate in your life to nourish your own body and spirit?

Nutrient Boosting.   I am a deep believer in a healthy diet.   A good diet buttressed with key supplements can play a large role in bolstering the body’s nutrient status, detoxification capacity, addressing inflammation, gastrointestinal integrity, cancer prevention or other specific goals.  Supplements are truly that– they are an appendices to the rest of the book—the main objective is eating whole foods that benefit all systems of your body.

On a personal level, the strength that I bring to my practice is my connection to the natural world and appreciation of experiencing periods of deeper calm than modern living typically affords.  I love to spend time in the bush, where the unrelenting pressures and stressors of fast paced living, constant accessibility and busyness fall away.  In Alaska’s remote places time slows down, the breath becomes deeper, and the waters within one’s heart can become a calm pool for reflection and insight.  We can gain a perspective on our place in the scale of things and the food chain. My husband and I lead a semi-subsistence lifestyle in rural Alaska, where we grow organic herbs, vegetables and berries and appreciate having wild beauty and bounty literally just out the door.